The ‘Worthington House’ wayside maker tells about the John Worthington farm during the Battle of Monocacy. Worthington House can be reached by a National Park service road that runs north from Baker Valley Road immediately west of the underpass under Interstate 270. (39.361649° N, 77.401921° W; map)

The Worthington House dates to 1851, and was purchased by John T. Worthington in 1861. John’s son, Glenn, watched the battle through cracks in the boarded up basement windows as Confederate artillery deployed around the house.

Two other markers are nearby, McCausland’s Attack and Worthington-McKinney Ford.

The Worthington House on Monocacy National Battlefield

The Worthington House marker (click to enlarge)

From the marker:

Worthington House

Fields of wheat and corn surrounded the hilltop farmhouse of John T. Worthington. Few trees obstructed his views of the meandering Monocacy River and Thomas farm to the east. In the two years since buying the 300-acre farm, Worthington had seen Federals and Confederates come and go, but this time both sides were amassing troops. While the family took refuge in the cellar, he had slaves take his horses to Sugarloaf Mountain. At one point, as he greeted Confederate Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge in the yard, a Union minie ball knocked the cane out of Worthington’s hand.

A view of Worthington House on its hilltop from the National Park service road

A view of Worthington House on its hilltop from the National Park service road (click to enlarge)

From the sidebar:

Eyewitness Glenn H. Worthington, as a boy of 6, watched the battle by peeking between the boards covering the cellar windows. In his 70s, after he had become a Frederick County judge, he wrote Fighting for Time, the only book-length account of the Battle of Monocacy for 130 years. This illustration of the house comes from that book.

Fighting for Time is still in print and available:

The Worthington House on Monocacy National Battlefield

The Worthington House (click to enlarge)